RCS Course Descriptions and Graduation Requirements

6th Grade Bible - The Christian Worldview

The worldview portion of this curriculum covers Christian answers to the “big questions” about God, the universe, human beings, truth, and morality. The Bible survey component focuses on the book of Acts. Key topics covered include:

  • Creation and the Fall
  • Covenants
  • Monotheism
  • Omnipotence, omnipresence, and omniscience
  • Revelation, theism, truth, and worldview

Course Overview: Amanda Cupp

7th Grade Bible - Competing Worldviews

The worldview portion of this curriculum compares and contrasts the key tenets of Christianity to Islam, naturalism, and new spirituality. The Bible survey component reviews Romans and 1 & 2 Corinthians. Key topics covered include:

  • Atheism, evolution, materialism
  • Islam, five pillars of Islam
  • Pantheism, reincarnation, karma
  • Righteousness, justification
  • Redemption, reconciliation, edification

Course Overview: Becky Derby

Course Overview: Amanda Cupp

8th Grade Bible - Christianity in Action

The worldview portion of this curriculum helps students understand how they can live out their Christian worldview in a post-Christian culture. The Bible survey component examines the remaining Epistles not yet covered in previous courses and Revelation. Key topics covered include:

  • Apologetics
  • Popular culture
  • Revelation, truth, knowledge
  • Science, relativism, Darwinism
  • Marriage and Family

The resurrection

9th Grade Bible I - Genesis (1 Credit)

Bible I guides students through an expository, verse-by-verse study of the Book of Genesis. Students will also examine a broad-scope view of the rest of the books of the Bible, with the thematic focus of discovering God’s Heart for the Nations. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • Foundations in Genesis
  • Personal gospel narrative and sharing with others
  • Biblical history timeline
  • Bible study skills
  • Service project

Course Overview: Pat Golightly

Course Overview: Daniel Buttram

10th Grade Bible II - Life of Christ through the Gospels: Gospel of Luke (1 Credit)

Bible II guides students through an expository, verse-by-verse teaching of the Gospel of Luke, with a thematic focus on the Jewish Roots of Christianity and life application. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • Scholarly investigation of the biblical text, examining the history, culture, religion, literature, and politics as related to the Gospel of Luke
  • The life and teachings of Jesus Christ
  • Jewish Holidays and celebrations
  • Exploring the land of Israel where Jesus walked

Course Overview: Matt Lister

11th Grade Bible III - Understanding the Faith/The Book of Romans (1 Credit)

Bible III guides students through an expository, verse-by-verse study of the Book of Romans. Students will also examine the basics of the Christian faith and learn how to defend and promote the biblical worldview against a myriad of detractors. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • God’s plan of salvation
  • Doctrines of justification and sanctification
  • Practical application of the Gospel
  • The Bible as Truth
  • Christianity as Truth

Course Overview: Adam Blehm

12th Grade Bible IV - Acts (1 Credit)

Bible IV guides students through an expository, verse-by-verse study of the Book of Acts with a thematic focus on what happened in the years following the crucifixion/resurrection of Jesus and the birth of the early church. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • Effective Evangelism
  • Right Christian Fellowship
  • Hearing from God
  • Following your call
  • Dealing with Persecution
  • Senior Capstone Project

Course Overview: Nancy Cook

11th or 12th Grade Bible III/IV - Middle Eastern Archaeology (0.5 credit, Semester 1)

Middle Eastern Archaeology guides students to discover the Holy Land of Israel by exploring the geography and history of the Bible, with a thematic focus on the historical and cultural settings of the Israelite nation along with the Jewish background of the life and teachings of Jesus. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • Influence of the Roman Empire upon the ancient land, architecture, art, culture, and people of Israel
  • Jewish Holidays and celebrations

11th or 12th Grade Bible III/IV - Anthropology (0.5 credit, Semester 2)

Anthropology guides students through a study of Jewish culture and religion beginning in the first century through the founding of Israel in 1948. Key topics covered and projects include:

  • The history of Judaism
  • Interactions between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
  • Jewish Holidays and celebrations

6th Grade English Language Arts

Sixth grade English Language Arts combines grammar and mechanics, writing skills, vocabulary, and an exposure to quality literature in several genres. Students will consider the power of language as a God-given tool and apply their learning in a variety of writing tasks. Students will recognize elements of “God’s big story” in every story while identifying literary elements and styles. Literature selections include Out Of My Mind, Hatchet, poetry, short stories, and drama excerpts.

Course Overview: Jo Ann Rogers

7th Grade English Language Arts

Seventh grade English Language Arts continues the study of grammar and mechanics, writing skills, and literature studies, with an added emphasis on oral presentation and creative writing skills. Students will use language and composition skills to write for a variety of purposes and will continue to look for elements of “God’s big story” in literary works. Students will mature as readers and writers through critical reading, thinking, reflection, and analysis. Literature selections may include Freak the Mighty; The Westing Game; Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; and The Devil’s Arithmetic.

Course Overview: Courtney Hollingsworth

8th Grade English Language Arts

Eighth grade English Language Arts completes the middle-grade emphasis on grammar and mechanics instruction. Students will continue to write for a variety of purposes and audiences, and will read from a variety of genres, including novels, short stories, poetry, non-fiction, and drama. From each of these genres, students will read to analyze elements of literature such as plot, setting, characterization, theme, style, and literary and poetic devices. Students will also identify Biblical principles, elements of “God’s big story,” found in the literature and consider how God uses stories to teach us His truths. Literature selections may include The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, A Christmas Carol, The Prince and the Pauper, and The Hiding Place.

Course Overview: Kellie Sanchez

9th Grade English I

Ninth grade English I is a comprehensive study of grammar, literature, composition, and presentation. Students will review and practice grammar skills (including punctuation, capitalization, spelling, research, and mechanics and usage) and demonstrate comprehension and application (in vocabulary tests, in creative writing, in constructed essay responses [narrative, argumentative, persuasive and informative], in research papers, and in oral presentations). With an emphasis on introduction to literature, students will continue to read and analyze literature in light of a biblical worldview, studying multiple genres and responding through writing and discussion. Literature selections may include The Outsiders, Romeo & Juliet, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Odyssey.

Course Overview: Tracy Lewis

Course Overview: Elise Kaase

10th Grade English II

Tenth grade English II introduces students to distinguished authors in world literature.  Students explore the authors’ lives and beliefs as revealed in their writings and compare them with authors of other literary periods.  Studies include drama, novels, and a variety of short stories and poems. Responding to literature through writing, students will analyze and interpret tone, mode and structure.  Continuing to write frequently for a variety of purposes, students will refine their understanding of process, audience, voice, and evaluation. Biblical principles will be communicated regularly with discussions of how God uses stories to teach his truth, and how stories were created by God from the conflict between sin and redemption. Literature selections may include A Raisin in the Sun, Julius Caesar, Frankenstein, and Fahrenheit 451.  

Course Overview: Elisa Kaase

11th Grade English III

Eleventh grade English III introduces students to distinguished authors in American literature. Students explore the authors’ lives and beliefs as revealed in their writings and compare them with authors of other literary periods. Studies include period exploration of Colonial-Revolutionary, Romantic, Realistic-Naturalistic, Modern, and Contemporary literature. Students will understand the role of the Christian faith in American history and culture and will evaluate the changing degree of evidence of a Biblical worldview reflected in American literature throughout history. Responding to literature through writing, students will analyze and interpret tone, mode, and structure. Continuing to write frequently for a variety of purposes, students will refine their understanding of process, audience, voice, and evaluation. The goal and emphasis of writing instruction is to equip students to be effective communicators for the sake of God’s kingdom and His work in their lives, their families, and their communities. Literature selections may include The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Black: The Birth of Evil.

Course Overview: Kellie Sanchez

11th Grade English III Honors

This enhanced English III course focuses on analytic and evaluative thinking skills as it introduces students to distinguished authors in American literature. Students explore the authors’ lives and beliefs as revealed in their writings and compare them with authors of other literary periods. Studies include period exploration of Colonial-Revolutionary, Romantic, Realistic-Naturalistic, Modern, and Contemporary literature. Students will understand the role of the Christian faith in American history and culture and will evaluate the changing degree of evidence of a Biblical worldview reflected in American literature throughout history. Responding to literature through writing, students will analyze and interpret tone, mode, and structure. Continuing to write frequently for a variety of purposes, students will refine their understanding of process, audience, voice, and evaluation. The goal and emphasis of writing instruction is to equip students to be effective communicators for the sake of God’s kingdom and His work in their lives, their families, and their communities. Literature selections may include The Crucible, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Black: The Birth of Evil.

Course Overview: Shannon Koss

12th Grade English IV

This course introduces students to distinguished authors in British Literature. Students explore authors’ lives and beliefs as revealed in their writings and compare them with authors of other literary periods. Studies include period explorations of Old English, Medieval, English Renaissance, Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern literature. Responding to literature through writing, students will analyze and interpret purpose and style. Continuing to write frequently, students will master the understanding of process, audience, voice, and evaluation. They will study and write a broad range of literary analysis and criticism. Biblical principles will be explored regularly with discussions of how God uses stories to teach his truth and how stories were created by God from the conflict between sin and redemption. Literature selections may include A Tale of Two Cities, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Animal Farm, and The Importance of Being Earnest.

Course Overview: Shannon Koss

12th Grade AP English Literature and Composition

This course is two college-level courses designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature and Composition Exam. The course focuses primarily on “close reading”: experiencing, interpreting, and evaluating representative works from various genres and periods. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Students will learn to recognize complex stylistic devices and patterns of organization in literature, and use those skills in their own writing. Students will have the opportunity to write essays (both in class and out of class) on a weekly basis; students will also write a weekly poetry analysis, focusing on the poem’s structure, style (including figurative language, tone, symbolism, and imagery), theme, and social/historical values of the poet and work. Throughout this course, students will continue to identify and analyze elements of the Biblical narrative found in the literature (such as sin and rebellion, grace, sacrifice, and redemption). The course culminates in students taking the AP exam in May.

Prerequisites: B+ average in English III or English III Honors, teacher recommendation

Textbooks: AMSCO AP Literature and Composition, selected novels (purchased by students)

Course Overview: Rita Ramirez

Course Overview: Shannon Koss

6th Grade Math

Sixth grade math builds on the foundations of Elementary math.  Students will work to master the concepts of operations with decimals and fractions. The course introduces integers and basic elements of pre-algebra, geometry concepts such as area and perimeter, and statistics and probability. This math course reinforces the idea that God has created the world with order and precision, and in the same way, math is designed with rules and order that can be used to explore and understand the world God created.

Textbook: Glencoe 6th Grade Math, Course 1.

Course Overview: Kathy Phillips

7th Grade Math

Seventh grade math includes the study of number theory, decimals, fractions, percents, and integers. This course allows the student to see that an infinite God produces a finite world. Geometry is included as well as some statistics and probability. Students will also explore simple equations and graphing.

Textbook: Glencoe 7th Grade Math, Course 2.

Course Overview: Melissa Hurst

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra includes the study of number theory, fractions, percents, integers, and rational numbers. This course allows the student to see a glimpse of the underlying structure of the universe as God has created it.  Geometry is included as well as some statistics and probability. Students will also explore solving equations and graphing. Pre-Algebra is offered to 7th grade students (advanced track) or 8th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Pre-Algebra, Accelerated Math (McGraw-Hill).

Course Overview: Kelli Ball

Course Overview: Eileen Johnson

Algebra I

Algebra I teaches the essentials of first year algebra, such as solving and graphing equations and inequalities.  As students explore algebra, they are reminded of our Creator God who is eternal–past, present, and future.  The emphasis of this course is on teaching elementary algebra as an aid to solving everyday problems. Algebra I is offered to 8th grade students (advanced track) or 9th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Algebra I (McGraw-Hill).

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

Course Overview: Kelli Ball

Course Overview: Eileen Johnson

Course Overview: Cheri Schuler

Geometry

This geometry course builds on students’ existing knowledge of two- and three-dimensional shapes, as well as figures in the coordinate plane.  Students are led to see God’s organization and intelligence by observing and making conjectures based on patterns in numbers and nature.  Students apply inductive and deductive reasoning to determine relationships among various polygons, angles, special triangles and lines cut by transversals.  Students use the proof process to demonstrate how connected relationships between figures and numbers can lead to new information or conclusions.  These skills are necessary for the student to continue study in the field of math and to further understand an attribute of God through His perfect order. Geometry is offered to 10th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Geometry (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Course Overview: Eileen Johnson

Advanced Geometry

This advanced geometry course focuses on analyzing properties of two- and three-dimensional shapes, reasoning about geometric relationships, and using the coordinate system. Students are led to see God’s organization and intelligence by observing and making conjectures based on patterns in numbers and nature.  Students apply inductive and deductive reasoning to determine relationships among various polygons, angles, special triangles and lines cut by transversals.  Students use the proof process to demonstrate how connected relationships between figures and numbers can lead to new information or conclusions.  These skills are necessary for the student to continue study in the field of math and to further understand an attribute of God through His perfect order. Advanced Geometry is offered to 9th grade students (advanced track).

Textbook: Geometry (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra I

Algebra II

Algebra II includes a review of skills from first year algebra. This course teaches the student that error is contrary to God.  Arithmetic answers are exactly right or wrong.  Algebra II emphasizes equation solving with some application to the solutions of word problems.  A TI-84 Plus or TI-84 Plus Silver calculator is required for this course. Algebra II is offered to 10th and 11th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Algebra II (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Course Overview: Miles Coffman

Advanced Algebra II

Advanced Algebra II is a second-year algebra course with an overall theme of problem solving. The course will cover material at an accelerated pace and will involve more in-depth thought and knowledge than Algebra II. This course teaches the student that error is contrary to God.  Arithmetic answers are exactly right or wrong.  Advanced Algebra II emphasizes equation solving with some application to the solutions of word problems. A TI-84 Plus or TI-84 Plus Silver calculator is required for this course. Advanced Algebra II is offered to 10th grade students (advanced track).

Textbook: Algebra II (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Advanced Geometry

Algebra III

Algebra III teaches the student that they can learn more about God’s creation through the study of math.  It is a further study of algebra skills and a basic introduction to trigonometry, probability, and statistics.  Problem solving skills will be explored.  This course is designed to help students in preparation for College Algebra.  A TI-84 Plus or TI-84 Plus Silver calculator is required for this course. Algebra III is offered to 11th and 12th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Algebra III (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Advanced Algebra II

Course Overview: Cheri Schuler

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus is designed for the college bound math student.  The student will learn that the laws of mathematics are trustworthy and steadfast like the Creator of all.  Topics from Pre-Calculus and Calculus will be explored as well as the complete study of trigonometric functions and applications using triangles.  Some of the topics will be logarithms, natural logarithms, exponentials, and the study of limits and derivatives.  A TI-84 Plus or TI-84 Plus Silver calculator is required for this course. Trig/Pre-Calc is offered to 11th or 12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbooks: PreCalculus (McGraw-Hill)

Prerequisite: Algebra II or Advanced Algebra II

Course Overview: Cheri Schuler

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus AB is a college-level course designed for the student with advanced mathematical skills.  It is a study of introductory calculus with elementary functions.  It teaches the student that God is. God does not change.  Included in this course is the opportunity to take the AP exam for college credit in Calculus I.  A TI-84 Plus or TI-84 Plus Silver calculator is required for this course.  AP Calculus AB is offered to 12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: Pearson AP Calculus

Prerequisite: Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

Course Overview: Cheri Schuler

6th Grade Science

6th grade Science leads students to develop a knowledge of God as the Creator, and it inspires curiosity, wonder, and appreciation for all things created. Students will learn science facts and skills and will practice the scientific method. They will identify the orderliness and precision of God’s creation, and they will show integration of science into everyday life. Students will be challenged to be good stewards of God’s creation.

Textbook: Science 6 (BJU Press).

Course Overview: Robin Peyton

7th Grade Life Science

Life Science highlights God’s perfect and intelligent design in every aspect of life, including the most basic as well as the most complex of organisms. Students study cells, plants, animals, and their relationship to their surroundings in a variety of ways. Every effort is made to provide hands-on experiences for the active and curious 7th grade mind.

Textbook: Life Science (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Misti Marley

Course Overview: Candice Longnecker

8th Grade Earth Science

Earth Science provides a practical and biblical exploration of earth science.  Subjects that will be covered in this class are divided into six units: 1) Introduction to Earth Science, 2) The Restless Earth, 3) Earth’s Rocky Materials, 4) The Water World, 5) The Atmosphere, and 6) The Heavens. The underlying theme is to compare and contrast the Old Earth View versus the Young Earth View.

Textbook: Earth Science (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Misti Marley

Course Overview: Scott Zingerman

Physical Science (1 Credit)

Physical Science is an introductory laboratory course where students are introduced to the study of Chemistry and Physics and how God intricately created the world. Chemistry is the study of the properties, classes, structure of matter and how God accomplishes this with only 118 elements. It includes such topics as the periodic table of elements, atomic structure, molecules, solutions, and chemical reactions. As we study the mysteries of things we cannot see, we will discuss the mysteries of a God we can experience.  Physics is the study of the interrelationships of matter and energy.  It includes topical studies in motion, electricity, and sound.  Students will apply their knowledge of scientific theories in hands-on laboratory activities and projects. Physical Science is offered to 8th grade students (advanced track) or 9th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Physical Science (Glencoe)

Course Overview: Matt Eakle

Biology (1 Credit)

Biology introduces students to the basic ideas in cellular biology, chemistry, genetics, microbiology, and botany during the first semester.  Labs will be added throughout the course.  The second semester will focus on basic ideas in zoology (invertebrates and vertebrates), ecology, and the study of human reproduction.  The information in this course will help students understand the role of biology in society and excel in future science courses.  The study of biology, from a simple cell, through the classification of kingdoms, to the complexity of man, will lead students to appreciate the works of our Creator God. Biology is offered to 10th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Biology (BJU Press)

Prerequisite: Physical Science

Course Overview: Sandra Cloud

Advanced Biology (1 Credit)

Advanced Biology is an accelerated class where students are introduced to the basic ideas in cellular biology, chemistry, genetics, microbiology, and botany during the first semester.  Labs will be added throughout the course.  The second semester will focus on basic ideas in zoology (invertebrates and vertebrates), ecology, and the study of human reproduction.  The information in this course will help students understand the role of biology in society and excel in future science courses.  The study of biology, from a simple cell, through the classification of kingdoms, to the complexity of man, will lead students to appreciate the works of our Creator God. Advanced Biology is offered to 9th grade students who plan to take honors science courses as upper-classmen (advanced track).

Textbook: Biology (BJU Press)

Prerequisite: Physical Science

Anatomy and Physiology (1 Credit)

Anatomy and Physiology is a course that will enable students to develop an understanding of the relationships between the structures and functions of the human body. Students will learn the terminology, anatomy and physiology, and pathology of each body system and how they interrelate to maintain homeostasis. This course will involve both classroom instruction and assessments as well as dissection labs. Students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the truth that we are “fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14). Anatomy and Physiology is offered to 10th and 11th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Pearson Anatomy & Physiology

Prerequisite: Biology

Course Overview: Candice Longnecker

Honors Anatomy and Physiology (1 Credit)

Anatomy and Physiology is an accelerated course that will enable students to develop an understanding of the relationships between the structures and functions of the human body. Students will learn the terminology, anatomy and physiology, and pathology of each body system and how they interrelate to maintain homeostasis. This course will involve both classroom instruction and assessments as well as dissection labs. Students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the truth that we are “fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14). Honors Anatomy and Physiology is offered to 10th and 11th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: Pearson Anatomy & Physiology

Prerequisite: Advanced Biology

Chemistry (1 Credit)

Chemistry is a physical science dealing with the study of the composition, structure, and properties of substances and the changes they undergo.  Genesis 1 tells us that God created the firmament and everything within it; this course combines the study of things we cannot see, like the atom, with a foundation of faith in the God who created all matter. It is through this faith that we can discover the mysteries of chemistry and how God used the atoms to create from the simplest molecules to the complexity of all that is living and nonliving. Chemistry is strongly recommended for those students who plan on going to college or technical training in a science-related field. Chemistry is offered to 11th and 12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: Modern Chemistry (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Prerequisites: Algebra II (recommended)

Course Overview: Sandra Cloud

Environmental Science (1 Credit)

Students will use a variety of science disciplines to help them better understand the relationship between humans and the world in which they live in order to best utilize the resources God has provided. Students will understand and describe the many types of environments and the complex web of relationships that connect us. They will explore the importance of conservation and protection of natural resources and conduct environmental research, seeking solutions for major environmental problems and pursuing ways that we as Christians can make a positive impact on our environment. Students will make decisions concerning how to fulfill the Biblical mandate of Genesis 1:28. Environmental Science is offered to 11th and 12th grade students (standard track).

Textbook: Holt Environmental Science

Course Overview: Scott Zingerman

Physics (1 Credit)

Physics uses mathematical models to introduce concepts that describe the physical world that  Almighty God created. Topics include units of measurement, laws of motion, forces, work, energy, machines, vibrations, sound, light, electricity, and nuclear reactions. These topics reveal that God has a standard we cannot achieve and highlights our need for a savior. Laboratory activities enhance understanding of the topics as the student experiences the concepts first-hand. This is used to show the students it is one thing to know about God but a totally different understanding will be gained when you have experienced Him. The fine details that must be met for the world to function as it does will be used to point to the Creator. Physics is offered to 12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: Glencoe Physics: Principles and Problems

Prerequisite: Trig/Precalc

Course Overview: Miles Coffman

6th Grade Social Studies

6th grade Social Studies leads students through a tour of the lands, peoples, and cultures of ancient civilizations in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Students will learn the history and influences of these peoples on religion and the world today. In this course, students will expand their biblical worldview as they compare ancient beliefs and religions with Christianity. They will enrich their critical thinking skills through the use of maps, charts, primary sources, and activities.

Textbook: Heritage Studies 6 (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Chris Owens

7th Grade Social Studies

7th grade Social Studies highlights the truth that God has a plan and He is carrying it to completion on a global scale. Students will explore the rise of early civilizations and recognize the Incarnation of Christ as a turning point in history. A primary focus of this course is the development of and changes in cultures, including topics such as the early church, feudalism, the Renaissance and Reformation, American colonization, industrialization, and revolution, up to the time of World War II.

Textbook: World Studies (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Brandon Johnson

8th Grade Social Studies

In this course students will learn that God is in control and understand the impact He had in the creation of the United States of America.  Students will gain an understanding of the importance of written records and how God expects us to learn from a knowledge of history.  Students will explore the history of America from the beginning of exploration of the New World, through the fight for independence, the creation of a new country, and up through the reconstruction after the Civil War.  Students will see that God had a plan for America and He is carrying it to completion.  Students will identify evidence of His plan through the historical records they will examine in this course. 8th grade Social Studies culminates in a class trip to Washington, D.C. in May.

Textbook: American Republic (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Michael McNamar

Oklahoma History (0.5 Credit)

The study of Oklahoma History and state government requires students to examine the historic as well as contemporary people and events that have formed and continue to transform the state. Students will demonstrate an understanding of important political and ideological movements, as well as economic, cultural, and social accomplishments of individuals and groups making a lasting impact not merely on our region, but on the progress of the nation.  God’s providence and Bible integration are given prominence as the students are taught to view the world through a Christian lens. Oklahoma History is a one-semester course required for 9th grade students.

Textbook: Oklahoma: Land of Contrasts (Clairmont Press)

Course Overview: Christie Wilson

U.S. Government (0.5 Credit)

U.S. Government explores the foundations of the United States government, including the faith of many Founders and the study of primary documents such as the Constitution. Students will develop an understanding of the three branches of government and the history and impact of political parties in America. This course emphasizes the students’ ability to solve problems and make good decisions when current events and economic and social issues affect them directly. Students will also learn about the election process and develop an understanding of their role and responsibility to participate in government decisions. God’s providence and Bible integration are given prominence as the students are taught to view the world through a Christian lens. U.S. Government is a one-semester course required for 12th grade students.

Textbook: United States Government: Democracy in Action (Glencoe)

World History (1 Credit)

World History leads students through an exploration of the history of mankind from creation to the present. Students examine ancient civilizations from the Greeks to the Roman Empire, and they survey India, Asia, and Africa on their way to the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Reformation, upon which modern history is founded. Students will trace the spread of Western culture through colonization and the 19th century missionary movements, and they will look at the causes of the world wars and the consequent end of the old order and the creation of the global society that we live in today. Through this process, we examine the impact that Christianity has had in a world of such varying beliefs and philosophies. God’s providence and Bible integration are given prominence as the students are taught to view the world through a Christian lens. World History is a required course for 10th grade students.

Textbook: World History (BJU Press)

Course Overview: Michael McNamar

U.S. History (1 Credit)

U.S. History is designed to focus primarily on 20th and 21st century U.S. History (post-Reconstruction to the present), which includes Black History and Native American Indian History. Students will be able to critically reflect on and analyze 20th and 21st century events, topics, and history and their impact on American culture and people groups, all through the lens of a biblical worldview that traces elements of the Creation, Fall, Redemption, and Restoration throughout history. U.S. History is a required course for 11th grade students.

Textbook: U.S. History (BJU Press), Into the Wilderness (Dr. Tracy Lewis)

Course Overview: Tracy Lewis

AP World History: Modern (1 Credit)

AP World History: Modern is an introductory college-level modern world history course. Students will develop their understanding of world history from 1200 CE to the present through analyzing historical documents and learning to make connections and create historical arguments as they explore concepts like humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation. Successfully completing this course will satisfy the core social studies world history requirement for graduation. At the completion of this course, students will have the opportunity to earn college credit on the AP World History exam in May. AP World History: Modern is offered to 10th-12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: AP World History: Modern (Strayer)

Course Overview: Michael McNamar

Current Events (0.5 Credit)

Current Events is designed to provide students with the opportunity to discuss, understand, and explore local, national, and international social and political issues through Biblical text and Christian perspectives. During the course students will stay up to date on current issues and trends. The subject of this class is “contemporary;” topics will vary depending on the current news cycle. The objectives of this course are for students to make the connection between current events and history, to enhance the student’s understanding of world events, to encourage students to be informed citizens, and to help them make intelligent decisions that align with God’s Word. This elective course is offered to 9th-12th grade students.
Textbook: Character Still Counts (James Merritt)

Course Overview: Christie Wilson

Introduction to Psychology (1 Credit)

This introductory psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes in accordance with a biblical worldview. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological basis of behavior, sensation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and evaluate each and every idea put forth against the truth of God’s word. Introduction to Psychology is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Textbook: Myers’ Psychology

AP Psychology

The AP Psychology Course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes in accordance with a biblical worldview. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception,  learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and evaluate each and every idea put forth against the truth of God’s word. At the completion of this course, students will have the opportunity to earn college credit on the AP Psychology exam in May. AP Psychology is offered to 11th-12th grade students (honors credit).

Textbook: Myers’ Psychology for AP (Myers & Dewall)

Consumer Economics (0.5 Credit)

Consumer Economics prepares students to manage their finances with wisdom so they are able to honor God with their money and use their resources for Kingdom purposes. Topics covered include budgeting, saving, credit and debt, consumer awareness, career readiness, college planning, taxes, real estate, investments, and more. This one-semester course is required for 12th grade students.

Spanish I (1 Credit)

Spanish I is an exploration of the Spanish language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Spanish is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Topics of study include the alphabet, greeting people in the U.S. vs. in Spanish-speaking countries, introducing yourself and others, telling someone what to do, and origins. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people. Spanish I is offered to 9th-11th grade students.

Course Overview: Matt Lister

Course Overview: Abigail Bustamante

Spanish II (1 Credit)

Spanish II continues the exploration of the Spanish language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Spanish is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Topics of study include conjugation of regular verbs, describing people and family members, talking about the immediate future, telling time, and talking about what one wants to, should, can, and hopes to do. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people. Spanish II is offered to 10th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Spanish I

Course Overview: Abigail Bustamante

Spanish III (1 Credit)

Spanish III continues the exploration of the Spanish language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Spanish is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Topics of study include Spanish-speaking cultures, vocabulary in context of literature, greater grammar proficiency, and using the subjunctive mood to talk about non-real and future situations, doubt, emotions, impersonal expressions, and negation. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people. Spanish III is offered to 11th and 12th grade students.

Prerequisites: Spanish I and II

Spanish IV (1 Credit)

Spanish IV continues the exploration of the Spanish language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Spanish is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Topics of study include caring for the world God has created and learning to share a personal testimony in Spanish. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people. Spanish IV is offered to 12th grade students.

Prerequisites: Spanish I, II, and III

Middle School French

Middle School French is a one-semester course offered to students in 6th-8th grades. It is an exploration of the French language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. French is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Students will develop communicative competence through interactive lessons, leveled readings, class discussions, and daily shared writing.  Through a series of genre-based units, students will develop their ability to interpret and express meaning in the language using the language functions of describing and narrating. Within the context of each of the genre-based units, we will be exploring the suggested biblical passages and stories found in the Discovery Bible Story method of discipleship. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people.

French I (1 Credit)

French I is an exploration of the French language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. French is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as the present day. Students will develop communicative competence through interactive lessons, leveled readings, class discussions, and daily shared writing.  Through a series of genre-based units, students will develop their ability to interpret and express meaning in the language, in various language functions: describing, narrating, narrating for significance, informing, stating opinions, and constructing text-based arguments. Students will learn to view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people. French I is offered to 9th-11th grade students.

Course Overview: Becky Derby

French II (1 Credit)

French II is a continued exploration of the French language and culture, using the language as the vehicle for learning and communication.  Each day, students will develop their competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. French is presented within the context of exchanging personal information and learning about cultural practices, products, and perspectives, in historical contexts as well as present day. Students will develop communicative competence through interactive lessons, leveled readings, class discussions, and daily shared writing.  Through a series of genre-based units, students will develop their ability to interpret and express meaning in the language, in various language functions: describing, narrating, narrating for significance, informing, stating opinions, and constructing text-based arguments. Within the context of each of the genre-based units, we will be exploring the suggested biblical passages and stories found in the Discovery Bible Story method of discipleship. Students view language as a gift from God reflecting His nature (orderly, reasonable, and systematic), as well as a tool to communicate His love to all people.  French II is offered to 10th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: French I

Middle School Drama

Drama students practice character analysis and learn how to create a dramatic character. Students may learn by performing the works of classic playwrights. Acting skills are developed through improvisations, scene work, focused theater exercises, group work, and monologues. Students will understand and appreciate that God has given everyone the ability to worship. Students will also understand that worshiping the Lord does not merely come from music, but through using our gifts given to us by Him for His glory. This one-semester course culminates in a dramatic performance; recent shows include Elf-The Musical, Jr., Honk! Jr.,  Our department strives to build a passion and a purpose within the heart of each artist for the glory of the Lord. Middle School Drama is offered to 6th-8th grade students.

Course Overview: Roberta Eberhard

High School Drama (0.5 Credit)

Drama students practice character analysis and learn how to create a dramatic character. Students may learn by performing the works of classic playwrights. Acting skills are developed through improvisations, scene work, focused theater exercises, group work, and monologues. Students will understand and appreciate that God has given everyone the ability to worship. Students will also understand that worshiping the Lord does not merely come from music, but through using our gifts given to by Him for His glory. This one-semester course culminates in a dramatic performance; recent shows include Newsies, The Little Mermaid, Little Women, and The Sound of Music. Our department strives to build a passion and a purpose within the heart of each artist for the glory of the Lord. High School Drama is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Choir (0.5 Credit)

Students in Choir will study the concepts of chorale singing. Students will become more familiar with reading music through sight-singing and exposure to various styles and genres. Students will perform two concerts every school year and collaborate with students from other schools in regional honor choirs. Students will understand and appreciate that God has given everyone the ability to worship and create music. Students will also understand that worshiping the Lord does not merely come from music, but through a variety of ways, including preparation. Choir is a one-semester course offered to 6th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Roberta Eberhard

6th Grade Intermediate Band

The 6th grade intermediate level band class develops skills for students in their second year of learning a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument. Simple ensemble literature will be performed in class. Performances outside of normal school hours are required as part of this course. The mission of the RCS band program is to nurture the gift of music through participation in an instrumental ensemble, providing students with a powerful tool for worship, outreach, and personal growth that can be used for a lifetime. Music is one of the many ways that God works through us and provides an avenue for spiritual growth and outreach, so that ultimately His name will be glorified and the message of the gospel is spread.

Course Overview: Emily Stevenson

Middle School Band

The middle school intermediate level band class develops skills for students in their second, third or fourth years of learning a woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument. Intermediate to advanced level ensemble literature will be performed in class. Performances outside of normal school hours are required as part of this course. The mission of the RCS band program is to nurture the gift of music through participation in an instrumental ensemble, providing students with a powerful tool for worship, outreach, and personal growth that can be used for a lifetime. Music is one of the many ways that God works through us and provides an avenue for spiritual growth and outreach, so that ultimately His name will be glorified and the message of the gospel is spread. Middle School Band is offered to 7th and 8th grade students.

Course Overview: Emily Stevenson

Worship Arts Class (WAC) (0.5 Credit)

Worship Arts is a leadership course for students who are interested in planning and executing weekly chapel services. Students in WAC participate in planning every element of a worship service, including intro activities, videos, announcements, worship sets, guest speakers, themes, transitions, lighting, sound tech, etc. The worship team who leads worship in chapel each week is comprised of students in WAC, so students who are gifted in singing or playing an instrument are encouraged to take Worship Arts. The Worship Arts Class is offered to 11th and 12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Application process

Course Overview: Pat Golightly and Roberta Eberhard

6th Art

In Sixth Grade Art, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist. This course is designed to meet the needs of beginning art students. The elements of art and basic design principles will be taught through drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture techniques. Students who are confident in their artistic ability as well as students who feel they are not artistic are encouraged to express themselves to their utmost potential. Students will learn to apply several techniques and solve problems during the creative process, and they will learn about the influences of individuals, communities, and cultures through the study of art history.

Course Overview: Anita Yocum

Middle School Art - 2D

In Middle School 2D Art, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist.  Middle School Art is available by semester for 7th and 8th grade students.  This class is an introductory course to the two-dimensional elements of art and principles of design. Students will be introduced to and develop techniques in drawing and painting.  Course design and class setup is project-based and focuses on developing and exploring personal artistic creative thinking, problem solving and aesthetics; each student explores their creative gift given to them by God as a means of communication with Him.  Students will explore specific Bible verses and  illustrate their meanings, while also researching and focusing on Christian artists and art history that shapes and encompasses our faith.

Course Overview: Anita Yocum

Middle School Art - 3D

In Middle school 3D Art, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist.  Middle school students will be introduced to the skill building within 3-D foundations, which will include developing techniques in sculpture and ceramics. Students will have the opportunity to experiment and refine their skills and explore observational exercises and age appropriate concepts. Elements and principles of design will be emphasized in each lesson, as well as higher order critical thinking skills and problem solving. Middle School Art – 3D is offered to 7th and 8th grade students.

Art I - 2D Art (0.5 Credit)

In Art I – 2D Art, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist.  Art I is a semester long course designed to meet the needs of students of all artistic ability levels. It will give students a basic understanding and appreciation for design principles and the elements of art. This course emphasizes skill development and the development of the creative thought process. This course utilises drawing and painting with a variety of mediums. A variety of mediums are used in this course to expose students to as many avenues of creative expression as possible.  Students will frequently explore Biblical principles, illustrations, and historical overview of Bible verses in conjunction with Art History. Art I – 2D is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Anita Yocum

Art I - 3D Art (0.5 Credit)

In Art I – 3D Art, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist. This course provides a comprehensive study in methods of sculpture and hand-built clay construction. Students explore three-dimensional design while developing both useful and sculptural forms. Creativity and quality craftsmanship are emphasized. Art I – 3D is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Anita Yocum

Art II (Advanced Art) (0.5 Credit)

In Art II, students will learn about scriptural truths, the work and importance of the Holy Spirit in the art process, and the exciting calling that God has for the Christian artist.  Art II, or Advanced Art, is a student-focused, project-based learning class, where the weekly projects or activities involve classic visual arts concerns and content. The projects cover a full gamut of art-making approaches including drawing, painting, design, drafting, and printmaking, as well as sculpture and three-dimensional design; projects also provide general and art-specific historical and cultural studies. Most involve new or enhanced skills, reading, learning, and research. Art II is more than just a compilation of art projects—these projects will engage and challenge students through reflection, analysis, and criticism. Art II is offered to 10th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Art I

Speech I (0.5 Credit)

Speech I is a course where students learn how to communicate in a clear, concise, and compelling way for the glory of the Lord.   In Speech I, students learn the building blocks of communication, developing their speaking as well as listening skills. Students learn how to prepare and present speeches to introduce, inform, persuade, and demonstrate; how to choose topics and adapt them to a specific audience; and how to create multimedia aids in presentations so that they are credible in today’s digital world. And, finally, they spend a great deal of time developing their delivery skills in order to bring life to a message and hold the attention of their audience. At the end of the course, students develop a Bible-based presentation using all the skills they learned throughout the semester.  Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to use the talents that God has given them and to be able to share all truth in a way that glorifies Him. Speech I is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Staci Henson

Speech II (0.5 Credit)

Speech II is a course where students continue developing their communication skills so that they might be able to share a message in a clear, concise and compelling way for the glory of the Lord.   In Speech II, students build on the skills they learned in Speech I to improve their speaking as well as listening skills. Students will prepare and present speeches to introduce, inform, persuade, and demonstrate with a higher expectation of the supporting material than is required in Speech I.  They will learn how to choose topics and adapt them to a specific audience. They will study how to create multimedia aids in presentations so that they are credible in today’s digital world. And, finally, they spend a great deal of time developing their delivery skills in order to bring life to a message and hold the attention of their audience. Speech II students will also have the opportunity to practice interviewing skills and group facilitation skills.  At the end of the course, students develop a Bible-based presentation using all the skills they learned throughout the semester.  Our ultimate goal is to prepare students to use the talents that God has given them and to be able to share all truth in a way that glorifies Him. Speech II is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Speech I

Course Overview: Staci Henson

Middle School Computer

Middle School Computer is an introductory course where students learn to effectively use technology to research, organize, create, and evaluate information and develop the ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. In this introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, operating system, and software applications. Students gain practice in using key applications such as word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software, and they will understand social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective. This course is offered to 6th-8th grade students.

Course Overview 6th: Paul Underwood

Course Overview 7th: Paul Underwood

6th Grade Robotics

The 6th grade Robotics course utilizes the FIRST Lego League program to engage students in real-world problem-solving experiences through a guided, global robotics program. Students will practice critical thinking, coding, and design skills as they build LEGO robots and compete in challenges with other Lego League schools. Students will also use the research process to identify and solve a real-world problem as part of the Lego League Challenge.

Course Overview: Robin Peyton

Computer I (0.5 Credit)

Computer I is a beginner one-semester course that provides introductory skill development with a biblical worldview in the electronic procedures of computer and printer maintenance, operating system skills, keyboarding, word processing, spreadsheets, multimedia presentations, communication, and societal & ethical issues. Students will also explore and utilize G Suite Apps (Google Drive, Docs, Sheets, Forms, Slides, etc.). The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective. Computer I is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Paul Underwood

Computer II (0.5 Credit)

Computer II is an  intermediate one-semester course that will review and expand on Computer I concepts. The course will offer skill development with a biblical worldview in the electronic procedures of web design, basic computer coding/programming, business letter writing and practical technology career applications. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective. Computer II is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Computer I

Computer III/Desktop Publishing (0.5 Credit)

Computer III/Desktop Publishing is a course that provides skill development with a Christian worldview in the electronic procedures of producing and editing publications including the school yearbook. Improved productivity of electronically produced newsletters, flyers, brochures, reports, advertising materials, and other publications is emphasized. Proofreading, basic photography (including photo editing), document composition, and communication competencies are also included. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective. Computer III is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Computer I

Computer IV/Computer Programming

Computer IV – Computer Programming is a one-semester course that provides accelerated skill development with a Biblical worldview in programming/software engineering and applications. Students will learn to design, code, and test their own programs. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective.

Prerequisite: Computer I, II, or III

6th Grade STEAMM

6th Grade STEAMM is a one-semester course that uses a project-based learning approach to integrate Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Mathematics, and Ministry. The SmartLab offers online learning engagements on topics such as alternative and renewable energy, circuitry, computer graphics, digital communication, mechanics and structures, robotics and control technology, scientific data analysis and software engineering. Students will work with a partner and may rotate between modules at their own pace and level of interest. Each specific discipline offers a range of foundational to complex systems of learning using technology. Students will set their own project goals based upon the content objectives, and they will reflect on ways in which they can apply the skills and learning from each module to a service or ministry-focused activity. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy.

Course Overview: Katie Winders

Introduction to STEAMM (0.5 Credit)

Introduction to STEAMM is a one-semester course that uses a project-based learning approach to integrate Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Mathematics, and Ministry. The SmartLab offers online learning engagements on topics such as alternative and renewable energy, circuitry, computer graphics, digital communication, mechanics and structures, robotics and control technology, scientific data analysis and software engineering. Students will work with a partner and may rotate between modules at their own pace and level of interest. Each specific discipline offers a range of foundational to complex systems of learning using technology. Students will set their own project goals based upon the content objectives, and they will reflect on ways in which they can apply the skills and learning from each module to a service or ministry-focused activity. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. Introduction to STEAMM is offered to 8th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Katie Winders

STEAMM for High School (1 Credit)

Students who have taken Introduction to STEAMM or who have shown an advanced proficiency

in STEAMM may choose to take the course as a year-long option. Students at this level may

continue to work with an assigned partner or work independently at their own level on

preferred engagements. The SmartLab offers online learning engagements on topics such as alternative and renewable energy, circuitry, computer graphics, digital communication, mechanics and structures, robotics and control technology, scientific data analysis and software engineering. Students will set their own project goals based upon the content objectives, and they will reflect on ways in which they can apply the skills and learning from each module to a service or ministry-focused activity. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. STEAMM for High School is offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Introduction to STEAMM

Course Overview: Scott Zingerman

6th Grade Physical Education

6th grade PE uses the Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) model. The LTAD model is a framework for an optimal training, competition, and recovery schedule for each stage of athletic development. Coaches who engage in the model and its practices are more likely to produce athletes who reach their full athletic potential. PE students will develop physical literacy and sport skill development. Topics covered include primal movement, dynamic movement, plyometrics, and sport- and movement-related games. Students will learn to honor God through developing and maintaining their physical bodies as temples of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19).

Strength and Conditioning (0.5 Credit)

Strength and Conditioning uses the Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) model. The LTAD model is a framework for an optimal training, competition, and recovery schedule for each stage of athletic development. Coaches who engage in the model and its practices are more likely to produce athletes who reach their full athletic potential. Students who participate in Strength and Conditioning will receive customized workouts from their coach, delivered through the TrainHeroic app, and will complete their workouts in a state-of-the-art training facility. Strength and Conditioning is a one-semester course offered to 9th-12th grade students.

Course Overview: Marty Barnett

Student Mentor Program (0.5 Credit)

The Student Mentor Program is an elective course available to juniors and seniors who are interested in investing in younger students at RCS. Student mentors will travel to the elementary campus every day and work with their assigned teacher to complete a variety of tasks, including one-on-one tutoring with students, serving as a “reading buddy,” or helping with whole group activities. The purpose of this course is to help the student build a professional working relationship within the school environment, working with a supervising faculty/staff member of Rejoice Christian School while serving elementary students. The emphasis is to build relationships with the students and help them grow socially and academically. The Student Mentor Program is offered to 11th and 12th grade students.

Prerequisite: Administrative approval

Course Overview: Pat Golightly

Middle School Contemporary Living

Middle School Contemporary Living is an introductory, one-semester course where students learn the basics of home and life management skills.  Because the Christian faith is central to both home and life, we integrate Christian values into every skill we learn and topic we discuss.  When studying relationships, child development, health/first aid, careers, home finance, fabrics, hand and machine sewing, nutrition, and cooking, we talk about how God is involved in all of it – from creation to His purpose/plan for it in their lives.  Being able to manage their home well glorifies God and prepares students to feel confident as they move into adulthood knowing how to navigate these skill areas which they will use every day of their lives. Middle School Contemporary Living is offered to 6th-8th grade students.

Course Overview: Melissa Hurst

HS Contemporary Living

High School Contemporary Living is an introductory, one-semester course where students learn the basics of home and life management skills.  Because the Christian faith is central to both home and life, we integrate Christian values into every skill we learn and topic we discuss.  When studying relationships, child development, health/first aid, careers, home finance, fabrics, hand and machine sewing, nutrition, and cooking, we talk about how God is involved in all of it – from creation to His purpose/plan for it in their lives.  Being able to manage their home well glorifies God and prepares students to feel confident as they move into adulthood knowing how to navigate these skill areas which they will use every day of their lives. High School Contemporary Living is an elective course offered to 9th-12th grade students.

6th Grade Study Skills

Sixth grade Study Skills introduces students  to methods and strategies for organization, study, and self-advocacy skill building.  Organizational checks are conducted each class period.  Through this course, students will learn to effectively utilize class time to monitor and complete assignments for all of their courses, and they will learn to appreciate the benefits of order and discipline.

Course Overview: Courtney Hollingsworth

Middle School Yearbook

Middle School Yearbook is a course that provides skill development with a Christian worldview in the electronic procedures of producing and editing a publication, primarily the school yearbook. Students are introduced to the skills needed for the production of newsletters, flyers, brochures, reports, advertising materials, and other publications. Proofreading, basic photography (including photo editing), document composition, and communication competencies are also included. The expected student outcome is to develop students’ ability to use technology in a way that both honors God and furthers their academic pursuits while applying a biblical philosophy. We strive to build students’ awareness of digital citizenship issues as well as their ability to use technology efficiently in many different contexts through the use of hands-on training, project-based learning, and critical thinking. Students will be expected to abide by the RCS Technology Acceptable Use Policies and practice discernment and integrity from a Christian perspective. Middle School Yearbook is offered to 7th and 8th grade students.

Course Overview: Daniel Buttram

Middle School Athletics

Middle School Athletics is an elective course for those middle school students participating in team sports. Middle school athletic teams (football, volleyball, basketball, track) practice before school and continue practice in the first period of each day. Students will learn to honor God through developing and maintaining their physical bodies as temples of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19), and they will continue to improve in discipline and team work.

Rejoice High School offers dual credit (high school and college credit) opportunities through Oral Roberts University and Oklahoma Wesleyan University. Dual credit classes may be accepted from any Christian university. Students may visit with the RCS MSHS Guidance Counselor regarding individual eligibility for the program(s).

Rejoice High School also works with Tulsa Technology Center for students to complete desired programs beginning their junior year.  Students must visit with the MSHS Guidance Counselor to discuss desired schedule and eligibility.

Credits                

Courses (0.5 credit is assigned per semester course)

4

Bible - Bible I, II, III, & Bible IV

4

English – English I, II, III, IV, English III (H), or AP English Lit. (H) or College English I & II

4

Mathematics – Algebra I, II, III, Geometry, Trig./Pre-Calc. (H), AP

Calculus (H), or  College Algebra

4

Science – Physical Science, Biology, Advanced Biology, Anatomy/Physiology (Standard or H), Chemistry (H),  Physics (H), or Environmental Science

3.5

Social Science – OK History, U.S. Government, U.S. History, World History & Consumer Economics

2

Foreign Language – Spanish I, II, III, IV, French I, II, III, IV or ASL I, II (2 credits of the same language)

1

Technology - Computer I, II, III, IV; Introduction to STEAMM, STEAMM

1

Fine Art – Worship Arts, Drama, Art, Speech/Debate, Speech I/Speech II

3

Electives – Athletic conditioning, Yearbook, Contemporary Living Skills, Current Events*, Graphic Design*, Psychology or AP Psychology (H), Leadership, Student Mentor, Student Service, AP World History (H)*, Dual Credit classes, or any of the classes listed above in addition to the required credits

0.5

Speech I

27

Total Credits

70 hours               

Community Service

CPR Training required Senior year (instructed by RCS nursing staff)